English

The English curriculum at Centralia College ranges from pre-college and college-level composition and literature courses to technical and creative writing.

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Writing Center The English Department operates the Writing Center on campus, which provides help with students' research papers, essays, scholarship applications, resumes and more. In addition, the center has printed resources, computers, and staff availale to assist. Visit the Writing Center website for information.

English Education Plan

Degree: Associate in Arts
Emphasis: English

Note for Students

  • To satisfy the 3-5 credit diversity requirement, students may wish to take ENGL 260 Non-Western Literature or ENGL 160 Women in Literature.

Fall Quarter

  • ENGL& 101 English Composition I - 5 credits
  • Humanities Distribution - 5 credits
  • Social Science Distribution* - 5 credits

Winter Quarter

  • ENGL& 102 Composition II - 5 credits
  • Elective (Literature or Creative Writing) - 5 credits
  • Humanities Distribution - 5 credits

Spring Quarter

  • Elective (Literature) - 5 credits
  • Health and Fitness Distribution - 3 credits
  • Quantitative Skills Distribution - 5 credits
  • Social Science Distribution - 5 credits

* History is recommended for a Social Science Distribution.

Fall Quarter

  • Elective (Literature) - 5 credits
  • Humanities Distribution - 5 credits
  • Natural Science Distribution - 5 credits

Winter Quarter

  • Elective (Literature or Creative Writing) - 5 credits
  • Natural Science Distribution - 5 credits
  • Social Science Distribution - 5 credits

Spring Quarter

  • Elective (Literature) - 5 credits
  • Humanities Distribution - 5 credits
  • Natural Science Distribution - 5 credits

 

English Courses

Individualized instruction for the student whose needs are not currently being met by the available course offerings. Specialized curriculum and instruction are developed to meet each student's needs. Permission of instructor only.
Topics covered in this course include basic spelling patterns, commonly confused words, apostrophe use, capitalization, plural formation, and how pronunciation helps to improve spelling. Students utilize materials according to pretesting information.
Builds a base of words used in everyday communication, provides systematic study, increases proficiency in oral and written communication and reading comprehension. Students are given a placement test and assigned materials at an appropriate level. 
Builds a base of words used in everyday communication, provides systematic study, increases proficiency in oral and written communication and reading comprehension. Students are given a placement test and assigned materials at an appropriate level. 
Course provides a systematic study of college level academic words and their roots, prefixes, and suffices to increase proficiency in oral and written communication. 
Study proper word usage, sentence structure, and punctuation. Writing includes personal essays and summaries. Emphasis is on improving grammar and writing skills for personal needs and preparation for technical coursework. Prerequisite: students must meet mandatory placement requirements to enroll. 
Prepares students for college composition. Students analyze texts, review sentence structure and punctuation, and write several short essays and other writing. Students must meet mandatory placement requirements to enroll. 
An expository writing course encouraging students to think and write clarity and conciseness; to organize and develop their ideas; and to express themselves sharply, economically, and grammatically. Students must meet mandatory placements to enroll. Prerequisite: Placement into ENGL& 101 or 5 credits of ENGL 099 or WRT 105 with 2.0+. 
A course in argumentative and persuasive writing, methods of research, development and preparation of original source- based papers and projects. Prerequisite: completion of ENGL& 101 with a minimum grade of 2.0. 
Lab hours in the Writing Center will support skill development and confidence in specific aspects of college writing, to be defined in an Individual Learning Plan (ILP) with instructor. 
Introduces the major genres, techniques and themes of literature by examining the work of a variety of classic and contemporary authors. 
Introduction to modern poetry (mid-19th c. to present) through the study of major English language poets: their lives, influences, and works. Prerequisite: ENGL 101. 
Survey of dramatic literature from classical Greek to modern plays, emphasizing basic elements of plot, character, language, and the traditional genres of tragedy and comedy. Students will attend two plays at their own expense. 
Examines literature written by women to understand how gender, class and race shape their experience and their writing. Genres will include poetry, short stories, non-fiction, fiction and drama. College-level reading and writing skills expected. 
Survey of short story as representational vehicle in romanticism, realism, modernism, horror, satire, science fiction, magical realism. Primarily American in focus; includes cross- cultural comparisons. College-level reading, writing skills expected. Creative writing options. Prerequisite: college level reading and writing skills. 
Learn about the life, times and works of William Shakespeare, how Elizabethans’ likes and dislikes, superstitions, and social order influenced this golden age of the theatre by studying six of the Bard’s 37 plays. 
Writers will move beyond the traditional “academic essay” into an exploration of literary genres to include poetry, creative nonfiction, short fiction, and drama. Prerequisite: college-level writing: test into ENGL& 101. 
Surveys how medieval and early Renaissance English writers explored issues like the relationship between rulers and subjects, God and free will, and the war between the sexes. Covers the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, and more. 
Surveys late Renaissance through Enlightenment writers like John Donne, Ben Johnson, Andrew Marvell, John Milton, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, and Samuel Johnson, emphasizing how writers reflected social concern about faith, politics, and gender roles. 
This survey studies how, amid political, technological, religious, and artistic ferment, English literature was transformed by the Romantic poets, the rise of the Victorian novel, and the innovations of modern fiction, drama, and poetry. 
Presents six classic American plays which deal with society and family expectations. Students will view, analyze, discuss, and write on the literary components and substance of these plays. 
Introduction to historical framework of this genre of literature and the authors and illustrators of children’s books from pre-school to adolescence. Classics as well as contemporary publications included. Reading to children at day-care included. 
An alternative to ENGL& 102 for science and engineering majors, focused on writing with clarity, objectivity, audience awareness, proper formats as well as research techniques, problem-solving, critical thinking and development of source- based writing. Prerequisite: completion of ENGL& 101 with a minimum grade of 2.0. 
Surveys three American literary movements: Puritans, Colonialists, and American Renaissance/Transcendentalism. Examines rise of a distinctly American literature, focusing on themes of faith, work, self-government, race and gender. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 with 2.0 or better or instructor permission. 
American literature from Civil War to World War I: Gilded Age of industry/capital, labor movement, postwar race relations, westward expansion, gender issues/ suffrage, shift from romanticism to realism/naturalism in prose and poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 w/2.0 or better or instructor permission.
Surveys development and diversification of American literature from Roaring 20s to the present, including modernist innovations in poetry/prose, the Beats, Harlem Renaissance, Latino/a, Asian American, Native American, feminist, environmental, science, and dystopian fictions. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 w/2.0 or better or instructor’s permission. 
Explore development of the American novel, its major themes and stylistic techniques, focusing on classics by writers like Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Chopin, Hemingway, Faulkner, Morrison, as well as evaluating contemporary works. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 with 2.0 or better or instructor permission. 
A major theme is followed through important works of fiction, poetry, and drama. Themes vary depending on the instructor and the quarter in which it is offered. 
Surveys rise and development of science fiction, focusing on short stories; students may address novels in course projects. Explores common themes; science fiction as social commentary; technology; war; relationships; race; gender; defining “human.” Creative writing options. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101. 
Literature of the non-western world, ancient times to the present: Middle East, India, Africa, China, Japan, Americas focusing on how literature expresses these cultures’ spiritual traditions, political values, gender issues, environmental beliefs. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101 with 2.0 or better or instructor permission.
Students will hone their creative writing, workshopping, and revising skills while working on an individual project. Prerequisite: ENGL 208 and instructor permission. 
For serious students who wish to prepare a manuscript for publication and/or writing program admission. Emphasis on workshopping, and revising of an individual project. Prerequisite: ENGL 271 and instructor permission. 
Study a variety of workplace communications, along with proper use of grammar, sentence structure, mechanics and vocabulary within those communications. Prerequisite: 5 credits of ENGL 098 with 2.0+ or placement into ENGL 099/ WRT 105. 

CONTACT

Christian Bruhn (he/him/his)
Dean of Instruction – Arts & Sciences
Office: WSC 118-A
360-623-8364
Email Christian Bruhn